Shenandoah National Park

Our attempts to visit Shenandoah in the past have been met with some challenges.  Originally we had reservations at Mathews Arm Campground back in fall of 2013, but had to cancel when we had to head back to Florida early for funeral.  Again, we had camping reservations for this past June, but cancelled when we discovered sub-floor issues in the Airstream.  Well, I delighted to write that we finally made it! 

Shenandoah National Park’s layout is based along one 105 mile road, Skyline Drive.  While this road has switchback curves, as well as ridgeline ups and downs, it is to a beautiful (yet manageable) drive for RVers.  Since we’ve arrived a little before leaf peeping season,  traffic along Skyline Drive was light, allowing us to ease our way down to Big Meadow Campground at milemarker 51.

For five nights we called Big Meadow home.  Our days were spent trying various trails around the area, such as Lewis Falls and Mill Prong.  We even spent one very foggy morning exploring the wildflowers, spiderwebs, and caterpillars of Big Meadow, which is appropriately name area across from our campground located at 3500 feet elevation. 

Our visit to Shenandoah was well worth the wait.  Andrew and I were overjoyed that most of Shenandoah’s trails were pet friendly and the wildlife, bobcats and bears, came out to greet us. 

Lewis Falls Trail, Shenandoah National Park
Lewis Falls Trail, Shenandoah National Park
Mill Prong Trail, Shenandoah National Park
Mill Prong Trail, Shenandoah National Park
Mill Prong Trail, Shenandoah National Park
Mill Prong Trail, Shenandoah National Park
Views, Shenandoah National Park
Views, Shenandoah National Park
Foggy Big Meadow, Shenandoah National Park
Foggy Big Meadow, Shenandoah National Park
Details, Shenandoah National Park
Details, Shenandoah National Park
Shimmering Spiderweb, Shenandoah National Park
Shimmering Spiderweb, Shenandoah National Park
Morning Dew & Spider, Shenandoah National Park
Morning Dew & Spider, Shenandoah National Park
Caterpillar on Trail, Shenandoah National Park
Caterpillar on Trail, Shenandoah National Park
Black Bear Saying Hi, Shenandoah National Park
Black Bear Saying Hi, Shenandoah National Park

Fort Meigs Historical Site

Over the past year, Andrew has become interested in researching his family genealogy.  He’s visited with family members to collect stories, view old photographs and peruse historic documents.  While visiting Jackson Center, Ohio, we made a trip to Fostoria to find some historic Hatfield’s graves.  Our most recent genealogy trip was to Fort Meigs State Historical Site, located near Toledo. Fort Meigs was constructed to quickly fortify the Maumee River from the British advancement during the War of 1812. Andrew’s third great grand uncle, Nathan Hatfield, served as a militia captain during the siege of the fort, a decisive victory for the US in the war.

Fort Meigs, Perrysville, Ohio
Fort Meigs, Perrysville, Ohio
Fort Meigs, Perrysville, Ohio
Fort Meigs, Perrysville, Ohio
Fort Meigs, Perrysville, Ohio
Fort Meigs, Perrysville, Ohio
Fort Meigs, Perrysville, Ohio
Fort Meigs, Perrysville, Ohio
Fort Meigs, Perrysville, Ohio
Fort Meigs, Perrysville, Ohio
Fort Meigs, Perrysville, Ohio
Fort Meigs, Perrysville, Ohio
Fort Meigs, Perrysville, Ohio
Fort Meigs, Perrysville, Ohio